FOOD SECURITY

While food goes to waste in urban areas, there are many underdeveloped areas where people repeatedly face a stark shortage of food which leads to problems like malnutrition, price hikes, and famine. There is a precise uneven distribution of food worldwide. Managing Food Security is one of the most critical issues to be solved under the ambit of Sustainable Development Goals as laid out by the United Nations.

Food prices are reaching all-time highs and the global population is continuing to grow, ensuring food security is a top priority for many governments. Guaranteeing the physical availability of food on a national and global level is a tall order. How can the nutritional and protective benefits of Boron be applied in the food chain to improve security? What we can do to ensure that everyone has enough access to nutritious food?

AVAILABILITY

Boron - Agriculture

ACCESS

Boron Borates Food Security

UTILIZATION

Boron - Micronutrients

STABILITY

Boron - Urbanization
Boron and Food Security
PODCASTS, FOOD SECURITY

Podcast – Boron and Food Security

In today's podcast, we're going to look at boron and food security. Boron plays a considerable role in food utilization, principally by improving the nutritional value of fertilizers for plant growth development. It also increases crop yield through increased nitrogen fixation rates in soils deficient in micronutrients.

Boron Nutrients in Rice Plants
Human Health, Farming, FOOD SECURITY

Boron Nutrition in Rice Plants

Boron nutrition is essential for rice growth and yield. It improves plant water relations and increases the total chlorophyll content in rice plants. It also enhances the kernel quality and reduces panicle sterility for rice plants.

Boron Deficiency in Woody Plants
Agriculture, Crop Management

Boron Deficiency In Woody Plants

Boron deficiency is widespread around the globe and constrains the growth and development of agriculture and forestry due to the lack of Boron in soil. Trees have a large body size, longer lifespan, and more Boron reserves than herbaceous plants, implying that woody species are more likely to suffer from long-term or mild Boron deficiency.